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Alford plea results in probation for domestic violence charges

| Jan 23, 2015 | Domestic Violence

Family disputes can be very tense and stressful situations that make people react in a manner that might result in threats being made. The results of these disputes and the subsequent actions of the parties involved can often involve the criminal court system. In the criminal court system, there are various ways that a person can answer to the charges placed against them.

In a recent case in Maryland, a man who was facing a host of charges walked away with a sentence of one year on probation. The charges he originally faced included two counts of first-degree assault, two counts of second-degree assault, driving with a suspended license and reckless endangerment. Ultimately, he only faced two counts of second-degree assault. Those were heard at a non-jury trial.

The man was found not guilty on the charge related to the assault against his wife because she refused to testify against her husband. She invoked a once-in-a-life spousal privilege. The man was found guilty of assaulting his cousin based on an Alford plea.

An Alford plea is a plea that acknowledges that the prosecution has enough evidence for the defendant to be found guilty of the charge. With an Alford plea, the person doesn’t have to admit culpability.

This man’s case shows that there are some options open for defendants who want to answer to their charges and move on with life. This man doesn’t have any jail time as part of his sentence, and he said he was happy with the defense he received.

Anyone who is facing domestic violence charges should explore all options available for pleas. Knowing how to handle your defense often means enlisting the help of someone familiar with domestic violence laws.

Source: SoMdNews, “Man put on probation for summer domestic incident involving shotgun” Andrea Frazier, Jan. 21, 2015