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Criminal defense: Drug charges for 2 people in motel

| May 20, 2020 | Uncategorized

People in Maryland sometimes assume that the judicial system is more lenient on nonviolent crimes. While there may be differences, nonviolent crimes can still carry the possibility of significant punishment. This is often the case with drug-related charges such as possession or distribution. It is incredibly important that anyone accused of these kinds of crimes takes the charges seriously and considers the applicable options for criminal defense.

Consider the recent arrest of a man and a woman at a local motel. Authorities claim that the woman had been renting a room there since the beginning of the year. Officers say they had previously had to respond to a domestic disturbance involving the two accused. Motel management reached out to law enforcement earlier this month saying that there was unusual activity of vehicles and people in conjunction with that room. A task force obtained a search warrant and went to the hotel on a recent afternoon.

Officers claim that they found nearly 60 capsules of fentanyl, suspected methamphetamine, cash and other drug paraphernalia. Both the man and woman were charged with possession with intent to distribute a heroin and fentanyl mixture and other charges. The woman was additionally charged with maintaining a common nuisance for the distribution of drugs. The man has two previous convictions for drug distributions on his record.

Though this case is an unusual example, it highlights the idea that the legal system takes nonviolent, drug-related crimes very seriously. Conviction here in Maryland for drug charges could result in significant jail time, hefty fines and probation. It can also be difficult for those convicted to find future employment. An attorney who has extensive experience handling criminal defense cases may be an accused person’s best option at fair treatment in court.