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What are domestic violence charges in Maryland?

| Dec 12, 2014 | Domestic Violence

Our readers have sometimes read stories about domestic violence. It is important for our readers to know how Maryland views domestic violence. Not only can this help victims who need to get away from domestic violence, it can also help people who have been accused of domestic violence to fully understand what they are being accused of.

What is domestic violence in Maryland?

Domestic violence doesn’t mean only physical abuse or bodily harm. In Maryland, stalking someone, sexually abusing someone and keeping someone against their will can all qualify as domestic abuse. Of course, these have to occur between people who live in the same home.

What are protective orders in domestic violence cases?

If the court finds that there is a reason to believe that domestic violence is an issue, a protective order can be issued. These civil orders can be sought by a person who is a victim of domestic abuse under certain circumstances. People related an alleged abuser by adoption, marriage or blood can file for a protective order. A spouse can file for a protective order. People who lived together with the alleged abuser in the past year and were intimate in the past 90 days can file. Other individuals might also be able to file for a protective order, so seeking assistance determining if a case qualifies is necessary if you have doubts about the accusation of domestic violence or the circumstances surrounding a protective order.

What is a peace order?

A peace order is essentially the same as a protective order, but the relationship between the parties isn’t a factor. Neighbors, strangers or anyone else can seek protection from a peace order.

Being accused of domestic violence is serious. It can affect every aspect of your life. Knowing how to fight against these accusations is vital.

Source: Maryland Courts, “Domestic Violence” Dec. 08, 2014