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Individual paroled after 36 years

| Aug 6, 2012 | Parole & Probation

A man convicted of murder and who had served 36 years in prison will now be released from prison. This individual was granted parole with the support of the prosecutor, who was originally responsible for charging him with the crime, and the current district attorney.

Though the ruling did not occur in Maryland, the implications of this ruling will likely influence other jurisdictions nationwide. The parole board was split in its decision, but it did note that a risk analysis put in place by that state’s legislature placed the parolee as a low risk for repeating any violent crimes.

The parolee was originally convicted of the alleged crime in 1976. He was 16-years old at the time of his arrest. Though he first became eligible for parole in 1996, his applications for release have continually been denied. It was noted at the hearing that the parolee has a “strong rehabilitative record,” and that he has not been guilty of any disciplinary violations during the last five years.

It must be noted that denial of parole in the past does not necessarily mean that such denials will continue into the future. Every parole matter is unique, and circumstances constantly change. Individuals show remorse, exonerating evidence is introduced, and sometimes laws change.

Individuals seeking parole may wish to consult with experienced criminal defense hearings concerning their own personal situation. Such attorneys can provide novel approaches when it comes to parole hearings, and can often uncover injustices in the manner in which a person was tried or sentenced.

Here, the man stepped into prison when he was 16-years old, and he now is over 50-years old. It must seem like another life to him since he first entered prison.

Source: New York Law Journal, “Parole Granted to Murderer Who Had Prosecutors’ Support,” by John Caher, August 2, 2012